Class Reunion

This page is intended as a place where classmates can "advertise" the products of their heads and hands--books written and published, art works produced, music written and recorded, even consulting services now offered--and where they can post information about their own websites (including those sites' URLs) and sets of photographs about themselves and their lives. There are no restrictions on the dates of such works; they can go back as far as the fall of 1953. For Classmates' Works, there is a limit of words--250 maximum--to each notice, exclusive of photos, brief descriptions, or lists of items or their contents. Photos of the products (say, of books, art works, or CDs) are acceptable, as is information about where the items are available for sale, especially if they are not available through conventional, national commercial outlets. A similar word limit pertains to Classmates' Websites and Blogs. 20 photos are the limit for Classmates' Photo Albums. Send all submissions to the corresponding secretary.

Click here for a list of books, with their authors’ commentaries, that were exhibited during the class’s 50th reunion in New Haven in 2007.

For a video of Bud Trillin's remarks at our 55th reunion, click here.

Older books by '57ers and other Yale alumni, as well as more recent '57 books listed on this site, can be found listed at www.yalie.com. For Class of '57 books, click here.

The contents of this page are:

Classmates' Works
Classmates' Websites
Classmates' Blogs
Classmates' Photo Albums


Classmates' Works

Arthur Wertheim, New Book on W.C. Fields's Stage Career (posted July 15, 2015)
Larry Kramer, New Historical Novel (posted May 20, 2015)
Henry (Sam) Chauncey, Jr., New Book on 1970 May Day at Yale (posted April 5, 2015)
Peter M. Wolf: Memoir (posted March 10, 2013)
John Leinenweber: New book on St. Augustine's Homilies (posted November 18, 2012)
David A. Johnson: Two books on regional planning (posted September 4, 2012)
James M. Banner, Jr.: New book on the discipline of history (posted June 20, 2012)
Gerald Jonas: Collection of poems, monograph on stuttering (posted June 20, 2012)
C. Brian Kelly: New editions of books on the Civil War and WWII (posted December 21, 2010)
Peter M. Wolf: New Book on Land Use (posted September 29, 2010)
Andreas Braddan (pseud.) [Hint: BSME '57, lived in Branford]: New Nautical Adventure Tale (posted April 29, 2009)
Donald D. Hester: New Book on 60 Years of American Monetary Policy and Banking (posted April 29, 2009)
James M. Banner, Jr.: New Book on the Historical Profession (posted April 4, 2009)
C. Brian Kelly: New Book on Winston Churchill (posted September 18, 2008)
Brian R. Walsh: Book on How Boys Learn (posted June 13, 2008)
Harold S. (Hal) Russell: Biography of Horace Capron (posted April 23, 2007)
Walter Benenson: Handbook of Physics (posted April 20, 2007)
Johannes Somary: New Music (posted March 17, 2007)
John Fistere: MultiGraph (posted February 8, 2007)
Courtney H. (Court) Haight: Steel Drum Music (posted December 7, 2006)
Jonathan P. Swinchatt: Book about Napa Wines (posted October 28, 2006)
James F. (Jim) Ziegler: New Book on Soft Errors in Electronics (posted October 9, 2006)
Arthur F. Wertheim: New Book on Vaudeville Wars (posted August 12, 2006)
Otis L. Graham, Jr.: Book on Immigration Crisis (posted August 7, 2006)
Robert D. (Bob) Bentley: My Paintings (posted August 2, 2006)
Norton W. (Nort) Wright: "Jazzworks" Paintings (posted July 29, 2006)
Robert W. (Bob) Ganger: New Book on the Vanderbilt Family (posted July 29, 2006)
Jerome H. (Jerry) Farnum: New Book on Roman Legions (posted July 22, 2006)


Classmates' Websites

Robert D. Bentley
Kenneth J. Gergen
Walter J. Loesche
J. Edward Meyer III
Malcolm Mitchell
Vic Norton
Zachary H. Sacks
J. Morgan Thomas
Robert Weinmann
Pat Wilde
Robert M. Young


Classmates' Blogs

John C. Fistere, Jr.
Bart Gage
J. Morgan Thomas
Brian R. Walsh '


Classmates' Photos

Eli's Chosen Six, June 2012 (posted September 9, 2013)
Hawaii "reunion", November 2011 (posted November 29, 2011)
Washington, DC classmates, September 2010 (posted September 14, 2010)
Chris Sonne and Roly Machold among Adirondack Peaks, Summer 2010 (posted September 11, 2010)
Psi Simons: With His Sons (posted April 21, 2010)
Bob Bentley: His Undergraduate Roomates in 2007 (posted March 24, 2010)


Arthur Wertheim, New Book on W.C. Fields's Stage Career (posted July 15, 2015)

From the press release: W. C. Fields from Burlesque and Vaudeville to Broadway: Becoming a Comedian (Palgrave Macmillan, 2014) . To be followed by Volume 2 in 2016, W. C. Fields from the Ziegfeld Follies and Broadway Stage to the Screen: Becoming a Comic Icon and Cultural Iconoclast.

A virtuoso comedian, W. C. Fields is often called a comic genius and legendary iconoclast who gave the gift of laughter to multitudes during his epoch and left a legacy of humor for future generations. As the first book to use the newly opened W. C. Fields Papers, this groundbreaking volume explores how he became a comedian during his less-known stage career from 1898 to 1915. As a tramp juggler in burlesque in 1899, Fields hit a roadblock. Either continue the same act, a guaranteed treadmill to oblivion, or choose another path. Fields makes a monumental decision---he will use juggling as a means to generate laughter. At this dramatic turning point he embarks on his long hazardous roller coaster ascent to the pantheon of great American comedians. The book reveals how his comedy initially emerged on the burlesque and vaudeville stage through the art of pantomime, a skill he transferred to the screen. Containing a gold mine of new information, the volume untangles a web of mysteries about Fields' turbulent private life and performance career, hitherto camouflaged under a smoke screen of hyperbolic stories written by publicists and Fields. Using correspondence found in the Papers, heartrending stories are told about his despair as a penniless and jobless trouper; his tragic relationships with his calculating wife, estranged son, despotic father; and a ten-year affair with the woman who broke up his marriage. Here is the saga of a complex dual personality, whirling from tenderness to brusqueness, who brought so much joy to millions while enduring so much anguish---a comedian who found refuge in his poignant comedy about life's frustrations and the human condition.


Larry Kramer, New Historical Novel (posted May 20, 2015)

From the book jacket: "Forty years in the making, The American People, Vol. I: Search for My Heart, embodies Larry Kramer's vision of his beloved and accursed homeland. As the founder of ACT UP and the author of Faggots and The Normal Heart, Kramer has decisively affected American lives and letters. Here, as only he can, he tells the heartbreaking and heroic story of one nation under a plague, contaminated by greed, hate, and disease yet host to transcendent acts of courage and kindness."


Henry (Sam) Chauncey, Jr., New Book on 1970 May Day at Yale (posted April 5, 2015)

in 2013, I had lunch with two friends in New Haven and mentioned that “Once again I have to give a talk about May Day at Yale in 1970 and have no decent pictures to show.” Those friends--John Hill, Emeritus Professor of Photography at the Yale Art School, and Thomas Strong, graphic designer and also a Yale Art graduate--indicated that they had a trove of pictures of the May Day weekend. From that luncheon three of us have put together this book. Its story is simple: In the early spring of 1970, a prosecutor in New Haven decided to put a number of leaders of the Black Panthers on trail for allegedly ordering the murder of a New Haven Panther. The reaction of the national, radical community was swift and violent. A rally was planned for May Day with the stated intention of freeing Bobby Seale and burning Yale and New Haven to the ground. This book,with the text by me and photographs by Hill and Strong, tries to present the tale of what it was like when more than 20,000 radicals invaded the city for a three-day weekend.


Peter M. Wolf: Memoir (posted March 10, 2013)

In portions of this new memoir I recreate the sights, sounds, tastes and an insider's look at life in New Haven during the 1950s. Throughout I've included passages and musings that reflect the yearnings and anxieties of our generation. My story, like many in the class, is an account of a restless guy who leaves the hometown he loves (New Orleans) to discover the world and, in so doing, to find himself.

Yale of our day and many of its particular rituals are included: the freshman campus, freshman counselors, meals in Commons, Yale Station, the colleges, the Yale Daily News, the Elizabethan Club, secret societies, Tap Day, Rocky Flint, Vince Scully, the Spot, the United Greek Diner, and lots more.

During undergraduate years, among my closest friends were Bud Trillin (who has written the Foreword), Henry Geldzahler, and Gerald Jonas. Their stories at Yale and later are woven into the narrative. Each from a more traditional Jewish family, through them I became aware of my own family's curious form of assimilated southern Judaism and the rigid social and racial stratification in New Orleans.

After a year of medical school at Columbia, I return to New Orleans to work in my father's cotton brokerage, where I learn about the cotton and international business. In spite of a spicy love affair, an exciting residency in the French Quarter, and growing prominence in town, the memoir follows me back east to earn a doctorate and become an architectural historian and land investment manager en route to my current life.

My New Orleans, as it accumulates through the story, offers one member of our generation's insight into a lost period of America's evolution, turbulence and possibilities, as unique and to-be-longed-for as the city of my memory.


John Leinenweber: New book on St. Augustine's Homilies (posted November 18, 2012)

In the Beginning Was the Word is a collection of Saint Augustine's homilies reflecting on the depths and intricacies of the Gospel according to John. His 124 homilies (tractatus in Latin) have been abridged and reorganized into 57 chapters for modern readers in conversational modern English. As Augustine spoke day after day in his cathedral church in Hippo (modern Annaba in Algeria), he employed his rhetorical gifts and prodigious memory "to each, to delight, and to move" his people to share his love for the Word become flesh, and to yearn with him for the peace that is God's gift to those who seek him. As he wrote in Confessions, "Our hearts are restless until they rest in you."


David A. Johnson: Two books on regional planning (posted September 4, 2012)

Planning the Great Metropolis: The 1929 Regional Plan of New York and Its Environs (Routledge, 1995)

One of my earliest jobs after graduating from Yale in 1963 with a Masters degree in City Planning was with the Regional Plan Association (RPA) in Manhattan. RPA was and is one of the most prestigious private planning organizations in the country. My assignment was to identify and propose plans for metropolitan subcenters as part of a "Second Regional Plan" for the 30-County NY-NJ-CT metro area. We enjoyed some successes in such places as Stamford, New Brunswick, White Plains, Newark and downtown Brooklyn.

Having worked on the Second Regional Plan I got curious about the First Regional Plan which was undertaken in the 1920's by the same group of businessmen who had sponsored the great 1909 Chicago Plan of Daniel Burnham, which had much to do with the shaping of modern Chicago following the World's Columbian Exhibition of 1893. These businessmen, moving to New York from Chicago, brought their ideas for a rational city planning process to Manhattan and the New York Region. With a grant from the Russell Sage Foundation they put together the most comprehensive (and costly) regional plan ever.

The book explores several questions: did the plan have an impact on the subsequent development of the region? And did the plan influence the public works of Robert Moses? He told me it did not. My analysis makes the case that much of the plan was carried out, and indeed laid the groundwork for the bridges and highways that Moses completed.

The tragedy today is that we don't any more have visionaries like those early civic progressives. Sadly, we can't even maintain the infrastructure we have.

The TVA Regional Planning and Development Program: The Transformation of an Institution and Its Mission (Ashgate Publishing Ltd, 2005)

The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) was one of the New Deal's central initiatives. It was intended to be far more than the electric power utility which is its main function today. Rather it was to be an agency for integrated regional planning and development. And it was to be a model for river basins in other parts of the country. I co-authored this book with the Chief Planner of the Tennessee Valley Authority, Aelred J. Gray, to get the planning history of TVA down on paper, before it became lost in the mists of time. Our purpose was to answer several key questions: how effective was TVA as a regional planning agency? What successes did it achieve and where did it fail, and why. I won't try to spin out the answers here. The story is too complex and entwined with national and global politics. But suffice it to say, TVA did have an impact on the South and the nation. Its power generation was critical in producing the energy that smelted aluminum for World War II airplanes and for the refinement of uranium for the Manhattan Project. And it made a large part of the South habitable in the summer thanks to air conditioning, changing the economic landscape of the country.


James M. Banner, Jr.: New book on the discipline of history (posted June 20, 2012)

Based on my more than 50 years of experience as a professional historian in academic and other capacities, I've written Being a Historian (Cambridge University Press, 2012) with an eye to both aspiring and mature historians. The book, designed principally for professional historians (and those of all sorts in all sorts of occupations) offers an overview of the state of the discipline of history today and the problems that confront it and its practitioners in many professions. I argue that historians remain inadequately prepared for their rapidly changing professional world and that the discipline as a whole, while greatly improved since the days I entered it, has yet to confront many of its deficiencies. I also argue that, no longer needing to conform automatically to the academic ideal, historians can now more safely and productively than ever before adapt to their own visions, temperaments, and goals as they take up their responsibilities as scholars, teachers, and public practitioners. Critical while also optimistic, the book suggests many topics for further scholarly and professional exploration, research, and debate.


Gerald Jonas: Collection of poems, monograph on stuttering (posted June 20, 2012)

This elegantly printed and bound volume offers a sequence of my poems "epitaphs," inspired by some of the great poets in the English language -- Shakespeare , Donne, Pope, Poe, Whitman, Dickinson, Yeats, Frost, Stevens, Williams, Eliot, Ginsberg and Plath, plus a few surprises. The poems are paired with haunting watercolors by my cousin, Sanford Wurmfeld, longtime chair of the Art Department at Hunter College. The poems and paintings were created independently, but we found, to our cousinly delight, that they spoke to each other on the page in unexpected and provocative ways. This is the opposite of an e-book, something to hold in your hands and enjoy over time. For more information, go to www.geraldjonas.com.


Stuttering has been called a social disease in the truest sense--it shuts offf communication. I stuttered as a boy, suffering greatly until the affliction faded away in my teen years, as it sometimes does, for reasons unknown to medical science. That last phrase, alas, applies to almost all aspects of this condition. In 1976, while a staff writer at The New Yorker, I wrote a Reporter At Large piece entitled "Stuttering: The Disorder of Many Theories," which was published the following year by Farrar, Straus and Giroux. It dealt with the rudimentary scientific understanding of stuttering at the time, but it was mostly an account of what it felt like to be a stutterer, of the agony of being unable to speak a simple sentence and having to devise drastic re-wordings on the fly, in order to say something approximating the original intent. (It's possible that this enforced education in word-choice influenced my decision to become a writer.) Unfortunately, science still knows very little about the origins of stuttering, and a cure remains tantalizingly out of reach. So the book retains a certain currency. In April 2012, Francine du Plessix Gray, herself a stutterer, writing in the New York Review of Books, called Stuttering: The Disorder of Many Theories a "splendid memoir."


C. Brian Kelly: New editions of books on the Civil War and WWII (posted December 21, 2010)

Just out---as of November 1, 2010, and once again, that is---Best Little Stories from World War II by C. Brian Kelly and, this time, his wife, Ingrid Smyer-Kelly. How does all that figure? Simple enough. Then consisting of just 101 stories, Best Little WWII first saw the light of day in 1989 as a slim, self-published volume by Kelly, then the first editor of Military History and World War II magazines.

Since it sold well, Kelly and his then-future wife Ingrid Smyer self-published two more Best Little Stories books, on the history of the White House and on the American Civil War...and they sold! By now, the mid-to-late 1990s, Ingrid was writing about the women in the historical period covered, and the two were married.

Well, as one thing led to another, Cumberland House Publishing of Nashville, Tenn., took over as publisher of the series, which next moved on to include the American Revolution, two more Civil War books, a greatly expanded World War II book, the Wild West, the history of Virginia and, in late 2008, an anecdotal (that is, still in the Best Little Stories format) biography of Winston Churchill, for a grand total of nine books in all. In late 2008 also, Cumberland House, along with the Kelly couple's line of historical books, were acquired by Sourcebooks Inc. of Naperville, Ill. Next, in 2010, Sourcebooks re-issued both the original Civil War book (with new covers and some new material) and the World War II book (also new cover, new material)--on March 1 and Nov. 1, 2010, respectively. This time, the World War II book, not so incidentally, included a biographical sketch of Eleanor Roosevelt, Woman for the Ages, by Ingrid.

Former newspaper reporter Kelly, who teaches journalism at the University of Virginia, now is working up some fresh material for a re-issue of the couple's Best Little Stories from the American Revolution (again to include Select Founding Mothers by Ingrid), planned for publication in the fall of 2011.


Peter M. Wolf: New Book on Land Use (posted September 29, 2010)

The excerpts that follow from a new book I've written, Land Use and Abuse in America: A Call to Action, will give you some of the flavor of the land use and community evolution problems I see facing America. The book itself is a personal account of lessons learned and thoughts accumulated over many years of thinking about, writing about and practicing. Throughout I suggest a better approach to the use and the conservation of our land, our precious water resources, and our communities.

"As America shows distinct signs of relinquishing its world hegemony in military power, diplomatic influence, and economic solidity, domestic matters gain new attention. There is, at long last, emerging broad-based concern about America‚s degrading physical environment and simultaneous looming shortage of capital, credit, and natural resources. As these matters roil financial markets, stir scientific inquiry, and engender political debate, they underscore the imperative for wiser use and diminished abuse of the land.

"People engaged in the domain of land use transformation are at the center of an epic. Everything that happens in the physical world affects land use, and land use affects everything that happens in the natural world, often for a very long time. Cities, towns, suburbs, and exurban development currently consume only 7 percent of the U.S. land area. As the population expands and economies evolve, much more terrain will be transformed, and built-up areas will be reconfigured. In the past, all across America, at every level of geography and at every scale of community, the natural land has been treated harshly and unwisely with adverse consequences.

"In this first decade of the twenty-first century, a half century after the environmental consciousness-raising years of the 1960s, a more aware generation is ascending to community, corporate, professional planning, and government leadership. It is becoming clear that the old systems of land use and abuse cannot and will not provide a sustainably desirable future. Long-held assumptions are being abandoned that resources will never give out, that there will always be another unspoiled place to settle, and that everything will last forever.

"Facing the inevitability of change and growth and being aware of past mishaps, urgent need exists for more insightful planning. There is a vast opportunity going forward to do it well."


Andreas Braddan (pseud.) [Hint: BSME '57, lived in Branford]: New Nautical Adventure Tale (posted April 29, 2009)

Sea Interludes: Rogue Adventure on a Tramp Steamer Cruise is a picaresque nautical adventure story, taking place in the late 1950s. It is chocked full of actual historical events and cultural idiosyncrasies of that period interwoven (with a bit of hyperbole) with my personal experiences in the Navy and then as a steward to 12 "first class" passengers on a Norwegian Freighter going around the world. The book is available for purchase on www.amazon.com and from its publisher at www.iuniverse.com.


Donald D. Hester: New Book on 60 Years of American Monetary Policy and Banking (posted April 29, 2009)

Springer Verlag published my most recent book, The Evolution of Monetary Policy and Banking in the US, in April 2008. It is a concise analysis of the evolution of monetary policy and banking institutions over the past sixty years that stresses the dynamic interactions between the Federal Reserve and banking institutions that resulted from financial market innovations. Institutions were influenced by increasing competition in markets and monetary policies. The book consists of two parts, which are organized chronologically. The first has chapters that correspond with terms of chairmen of the Federal Reserve Board. It critically analyzes decisions taken by the Federal Open Market Committee in each period and argues that innovations forced changes in the design and conduct of monetary policy. The second part analyzes how banking institutions evolved from a very conservative and regulated system in 1945 to highly inventive financial firms and how this evolution has affected the distribution of credit, wealth, and income in the US.


James M. Banner, Jr.: New Book on the Historical Profession (posted April 4, 2009)

A fellow historian, John Gillis, and I have commissioned and gathered a collection of eleven essay-length memoirs from as many historians from the path-breaking generation of historians born a few years either side of 1940 (including myself) about how and why we became the historians we became. It is, I believe, a unique collection of such essays written by women as well as men, and it includes memoirs by public as well as academic historians, a non-American, an Afro-Caribbean, and a gay historian all from a variety of origins and institutions. The introduction to the collection draws some general conclusions from the essays about the experiences of our generation of historians and what our work has meant for the discipline of history and for historical knowledge. The book, published by the University of Chicago Press, can be ordered through the Press’s website and through such general services as amazon.com.


C. Brian Kelly: New Book on Winston Churchill (posted September 18, 2008)

Having taken, and loved, Daily Themes at Bulldog U, I've been writing daily themes almost daily ever since---first in 20 years of newspaper work (most of them at the late and lamented Washington Star), then in 11 years as a historical magazines editor and in another 11 as magazine columnist (Military History magazine in both cases), and nowadays as a historical books writer...but always indulging in the short take, as once upon a distant time was the case in Daily Themes.

Anyway, my wife Ingrid and I have now produced the ninth book in our historical series called Best Little Stories. This time it's Best little Stories from the Life and Times of Winston Churchill, by yours truly, including His American Mother by my wife, Ingrid Smyer.

Running to 420 pages and published by Cumberland House Publishing of Nashville, TN, it's an anecdotal biography of the great and inspiring World War II leader. So far as I can tell, it may be the first biography of Churchill by an American since William Manchester began his three-volume biography but then died before he could finish it. Our book had its start, really, with an invitation to appear as lecturers at a week-long seminar held at Oxford University in the summer of 2007 under the auspices of the adult education programs at Oxford and the University of Virginia, where I have been teaching journalism since 1980. We did the lecturing and now, a year or so later, here's the book!

The other books in our historical series, started in 1989 as a self-publishing venture, range in subject from three on the American Civil War to one each on the American Revolution, World War II, the Wild West, the White House and Virginia. Hope you'll try one of them---or our latest! Available at any bookstore, amazon.com...the usual places. Just look for or special order Best Little Stories on Churchill, etc., by C. Brian Kelly and Ingrid Smyer.


Brian R. Walsh: Book on How Boys Learn (posted June 13, 2008)

After forty-two years in independent schools, thirty of them as a headmaster, I retired from The Buckley School in New York City in 2001. Since then I have been providing consulting services for parents and students who are contemplating independent education, and co-directing a program for training first-year teachers in independent schools.

While happily I have had more time to devote to grandchildren, I have also been able to reflect on the changes that have occurred in independent education, and the ways children learn. One of the direct results of my reflections is a new book just published by TMCBooks, LLC of Conway, New Hampshire: Boys Should Be Boys, A Headmaster’s Reflections. This is a memoir style book about how boys learn differently than girls, make friends differently, have entirely different issues of self-esteem and motivation, react to their parents and teachers differently, and, in fact, process just about everything differently. These observations are presented through anecdotes of actual school situations and, more significantly, through the voices and actions of the boys themselves.

This book is available at barnesandnoble.com, and amazon.com, and can be ordered through the publisher.


Harold S. (Hal) Russell: Biography of Horace Capron (posted April 23, 2007)

Prior to my retirement at the turn of the millennium, I resolved to write a biography of a little known 19th century American, General Horace Capron, my great great grandfather. Controversial then and even today, Capron has been described as the Edwards Deming of his day who disappeared into semi-obscurity after spending four years in Japan, just after the Meiji restoration, advising the government on how to develop the large northern island of Hokkaido. With Jim Banner's help, The University Press of America has published the book and has it for sale on their web site for $24.65. Amazon, and bookstores sell it for $29.

As a total doofus who can't type even today and who had not written a long and serious non-legal paper since senior year at Yale, this presented a series of challenges, most of which I failed more than once, but it forced me to educate myself on a series of topics such as: the Civil War (among other things I read Shelby Foote's 14 volumes), the American Revolution, the Wars of 1812 and with Mexico, the life and times of Zachary Taylor, John Hunt Morgan and W.T. Sherman and much more. I visited Utica, New York for several days, Peoria, Illinois, and Kenosha, Wisconsin, Laurel, Maryland, the battlefields of the south and Andersonville, and of course Japan, including a week in Sapporo. All these played a role in his extraordinary life. It was an exhilarating experience and I'd love to do another biography before senility overtakes me. All ideas are most welcome.


Walter Benenson: Handbook of Physics (posted April 20, 2007)

"Nucleus Factory" is a science TV program that was aired around the country on PBS stations about two years ago. It is mainly about nuclear astrophysics, in particular how the elements were created. I especially like the animations that I did with several undergraduate computer science majors. The narration by Linda Hunt is very well done. The music is also good, an original score created by a professor of jazz here at Michigan State and performed by local musicians. There is also a web site about it http://wkar.org/nucleusfactory/ If you want a copy of the DVD, I can send you one gratis. Email me at benenson@msu.edu.

You should order this book from Amazon. "Handbook of Physics" by Walter Benenson, John W. Harris, Horst Stocker, and Holger Lutz, American Institute of Physics; 1 edition (2006) 1249 pages. You can raise its ranking considerably with just one order as you can see on Amazon. "Amazon.com Sales Rank: #475,145 in Books." It does have a five star rating, however.

A book like this takes an incredible amount of work because it must be error-free, and there are thousands and thousands of equations and figures. It is selling quite well actually, mainly to libraries.


Johannes Somary: New Music (posted March 17, 2007)

A new disc entitled "Music of Johannes Somary," distributed by Albany Records, is now available by ordering it directly from Albany Music, 915 Broadway, Albany, NY 12207.

Other examples of my music on Vanguard is available through Arkivmusic.com, Amazon.com, the Musical Heritage Society, or in good record stores that are still in existence. Musical Heritage did recently have a special on my recording of the Bach Brandenburg Concertos. It's hard to know who has what anymore these days.

My recording of my song cycle entitled "Many-Colored Brooms" with words by Emily Dickinson is available on Leonarda Records, and they have a web page from which one can order their discs.

Who's performing? Well most of my Vanguard discs were recorded in London with the excellent English Chamber Orchestra. The choral works have such distinguished soloists as Elly Ameling, Heather Harper, Maureen Forrester, Ernst Haeffliger, and Robert Tear. The Albany disc includes my AmorArtis Chamber Chorus as well as members of the St. Petersburg Philharmonic Orchestra.


John Fistere: MultiGraph (posted February 8, 2007)

Sample graph. Click to see a larger version.

Plot Your Medical History with the free MultiGraph Service!

If you have ever watched your doctor flip through a two-inch thick chart trying to get a feel for your medical case, and wondered how he makes sense of it all, you will appreciate the MultiGraph service.

Prostate cancer patients write a chronological history containing their relevant medical data, or fill in an online form with the data. I receive the data via email and usually with just a few mouse clicks, the MultiGraph program reads their data and creates and sends them back an email with one or more graphs of their history. They and their doctors can then graphically review the time relationships of treatments, procedures, and medical results.

The MultiGraph program is a software application I've developed over the years as a "recreational programmer". A few years ago we made it a free service of the Prostate Cancer Research and Education Foundation. Dr. Israel Barken, Chairman and Medical Director, and many survivors have made suggestions for the program, most of which I've implemented. We've done thousands of MultiGraphs for over 800 patients, and continue to do, at a rate of two or three a week, many of them updates for patients with new information.

The program is not restricted to prostate cancer uses, or even medical uses.

You can find out about the Foundation and the MultiGraph (not Medigraph) service at http://www.pcref.org, or you can go straight to the instructions at http://www.pcref.org/instruction.php or to the online form athttp://jfistere.the-dreaming.net/ MultiGraphDataEntry.htm. Examples of simple and complex MultiGraphs are at http://members.cox.net/jfistere/FistereGraph. htm and http://www.762betula.net/pcdigest/. You are invited to give it a try.


Courtney H. (Court) Haight: Steel Drum Music (posted December 7, 2006)

I retired to Blue Hill, Maine in 1990, after a career in international banking to begin a new career in hydroponic farming. Luckily for us, Blue Hill is culturally a vibrant place. Early in our stay, in 1991, an announcement appeared in the local newspaper: an adult education class would be held, the title of which was "Learn how to play in a Steel Band." My wife, Woody, suggested that I sign up for the class, to take a break from our farming activities. Happily for me, these early classes proved that playing the steel drums is "user friendly" for those of us who consider themselves musically "challenged" with no training in any musical instrument. I became an enthusiastic student.

There had been steel bands playing in the area for some years, and one of those was a community steel band called Flash in the Pans, which played street dance concerts on Monday nights all summer long. Woody and I were in attendance for those concerts from our early days in Blue Hill. After a few years of playing in the "beginner" and "intermediate" classes, I formally joined Flash in the Pans in 1994, when for my 60th birthday, the family contributed to the purchase of my own set of pans, which allowed me to practice at home; and practice was and still is necessary!

Flash in the Pans is a group of 35 - 40 volunteer adults, from all walks of life, from high-schoolers to old folks like me (I am not the only 70+ year-old member) who gather to play year around, street dances in the summer and learning new music in the winter. We sponsor a town wide New Years Eve celebration, which is our big community service effort of the year, although most of our summer street dances are benefit performances for various non-profits such as local libraries, museums, alcohol and drug abuse groups, etc. What funds are generated from the sale of our CD's go to support scholarships for youngsters so that they may take steel band classes where local schools do not have music as a part of the curriculum. Thus we try to ensure that steel band is available to students from age 6 through high school. These youngsters are the "farm team" for Flash in the Pan. Indeed, some former students have started up steel band programs in other schools in other parts of the country.

This group has become a second "family" for me, particularly after the death of my dear Woody in early 2005. The proof of what we do for fun can be heard on our CD. I will have copies of the CD with me at our 50th Reunion of the Class of 1957 in May 2007. Our schedule of performances, CD ordering instructions, and historical information about the steel pan is on our web site www.peninsulapan.org


Jonathan P. Swinchatt: Book about Napa Wines (posted October 28, 2006)

In 2004, the University of California Press published The Winemaker's Dance: Exploring Terroir in the Napa Valley," a book I wrote with my friend David Howell about wine and place. Along the way, we delve into a variety of other influences on wine character, from viticulture to wine criticism, using the Napa Valley as the backdrop. Jim Banner gave the book a nice review in the class column but ended with the commercial kiss of death, calling it a "serious" book. Other critics generally found it quite accessible, as you can judge for yourself from reviews at this site. The Winemaker's Dance was a finalist for book of the year in the wine, beer, or spirits category of the International Association of Cooking Professionals in 2005. Over the past few months I have been working on a series of articles for The World of Fine Wine—a relatively new and beautifully produced wine magazine published in London—that explore the interaction of wine, place, people, and culture. Three have appeared so far, on Napa, the Walla Walla Valley in Washington, and the Willamette Valley, with one on Santa Barbara County due out in December. I have the Walla Walla article in pdf format, and can send it to any of you who are interested if you provide an email address. Just mail me at: swin36@cox.net. If you are interested in how a geologist got involved in the world of wine, go to http://www.earthvisioninc.com for that story and a description of my approach to understanding vineyards from a different perspective.


James F. (Jim) Ziegler: New Book on Soft Errors in Electronics (posted October 9, 2006)

"Soft Errors in Electronics – History, Status and Trends. A Guide for Designing with Memory Integrated Circuits"

About 25 years ago, I got interested in terrestrial cosmic rays. These are particles that originate outside our galaxy, and wander for millions of years and finally might hit Earth. They are not rare – the cascades from these particles send about two million particles a day through your body. These particles are the source for almost all methods of dating of ancient things. When you consider the interaction of this flux of energetic particles with ultra-sensitive integrated circuits, there is the probability that there will be random micro-bangs. I published the first paper about this possible effect in 1979. By 1985, about $300M a year was being spent on this effect, which got the nickname of soft-fails. This is because the cosmic ray interaction would change the content of a stored number, but have no effect on the hardware. By 2005, there are six major conferences each year about this effect, and how to attempt to mitigate its problems. As an example, last year on Christmas eve, the United Airlines network got hit with a soft fail, and 68,000 passengers were stranded because the airplanes and crews couldn't be assigned and there was no record of any passengers. Last year, Cypress Semiconductor Co. asked me to write a review of the history of soft fails, and predict trends. Of special note to classmates are the lock-up effects on implantable devices such as pacemakers and implanted insulin pumps. The book is available from the Cypress website in four languages for $25, www.cypress.com. Or write to me, and I'll send you a copy in exchange for the postage. It does have a lot of equations.


Arthur F. Wertheim: New Book on Vaudeville Wars (posted August 12, 2006)

I have recently published Vaudeville Wars (Palgrave Macmillan, 2006), a book that illuminates the exciting story about how the tycoons of the two most powerful circuits, Keith-Albee in the East and the Orpheum in the West, conspired to control the the big time and its performers.  These circuits revolutionized popular stage entertainment by breaking with the bawdy concert-saloon tradition  by offering  wholesome amusement that appealed broadly to families and many sectors of society. In the early 1900s, the circuits created an oligopoly called the Combine, a territorial alliance that gave Keith-Albee and the Orpheum control of the "big time" from the Atlantic to the Pacific Coasts.  I show how the Combine used cutthroat tactics to suppress rival owners and to squash performers' rights (and their White Rats' union) through strikebreaking and blacklisting.  My book describes how Joseph P. Kennedy masterminded a takeover of Keith-Albee/Orpheum through clever stock manipulations and then linked the company to RCA to form Radio Keith Orpheum. When the "big-time" venues, including the famous Palace, became RKO sound movie theaters, the curtain descended on the vaudeville wars.

Since graduation, I have also written other books on 20th Century American culture, including The New York Little Renaissance (NYU Press, 1976) and Radio Comedy (Oxford, 1979)  as well as edited three volumes of The Papers of Will Rogers (Univiversity of Oklahoma Press, (1992, 1996, 2000), Will Rogers at the Ziegfeld Follies (University of Oklahoma Press, 1992), and American Popular Culture(ABC-Clio, 1984).

These works might never have been written if it was not for two inspirational professsors in American Studies at Yale:  Norman Holmes Pearson and Robert Bone.

For more information see www.vaudevillewars.com and amazon.com.


Otis L. Graham, Jr.: Book on Immigration Crisis (posted August 7, 2006)

In 2004 I published (well, Rowman and Littlefield did, officially) Unguarded Gates: A History of America's Immigration Crisis, my 17th book, written or edited—and the most important. (Did I hear Banner say, easily the most, as none of the rest have been?). It is what the title promises and should clear up any questions you have about how this nation got itself into the current (and for three decades) out-of-control immigration fiasco. All in 204 pages of prose, most of them dealing with the recent past and the present. And available through all conventional booksellers.


Robert D. (Bob) Bentley: My Paintings (posted August 2, 2006)

I can't do anything but draw and paint. I figured it out in '75 when I lined up categories on unlined white paper, after two real jobs (advertising and brokerage) that I hated and at which I was not very apt. "Artist" was the only mark I could honestly check.

I paint people, lots of them: Prominent people (George W. and Laura in the White House), private people (Lester Crown, Vern Louks), caricatures (shades of the Yale Record), and landscapes/waterscapes. I have developed a process which works. I visit the portrait client, draw many, many sketches, give them my recommendations as to likeness and pose for their aggrement and I come home to my studio in WI, and stretch the canvas and paint.

Two months later I send them a digital image or a hard copy of the painting in progress and ask for their thoughts. I present the portrait shortly thereafter. I charge $10-20,000 per figure with 30-50% more for additional detail (multiples get a discount), and I ask one-third in advance with the balance due on successful completion. In 30 years I have had two failures, and I don't want to talk about them.

I figure that if you can draw something, you can color it. Oils are the most flexible medium; a good oil painter can make his work look like a watercolor, a pastel (Casatte), like a photograph (Ingres), or like a juicy, painterly garden (Monet). The above are my own theories.

Now, if you want more, I have classes in January here in Ellison Bay, WI. And my website is www.rdbentley.com.


Norton W. (Nort) Wright: "Jazzworks" Paintings (posted July 29, 2006)

Inspired by my "JazzWorks" series of abstract paintings, here's a fresh verbal salute to the music of Jerome Kern:
You say Purina
And I say piranha
You say Carmina
And I say Burana
Purina, piranha
Carmina, Burana
Let's call the whole thing Orff

My colorful abstract expressionist paintings visualize the sound of the giants of jazz.  See what the music of Miles Davis, Theolonius Monk, Pat Metheny, Marian McPartland, and  other jazz greats LOOKS LIKE!  Samples of the paintings can be viewed and purchased through the Schomburg Gallery in Los Angeles. Its website for viewing the paintings is www.schomburggallery.com.


Robert W. (Bob) Ganger: New Book on the Vanderbilt Family (posted July 29, 2006)

I authored my first book a mere 48 years after graduation. It was recently awarded Best Non-Fiction-2005 in regional judging by Independent Publisher, an association representing several thousand independent, university, and small press publishers in North America.

Entitled "Lila Vanderbilt Webb's Miradero:  Window on an Era," the book recounts the life and times of a relatively unknown member of the otherwise celebrated family of William Henry Vanderbilt, heir to the Commodore Vanderbilt shipping and railroad fortune.  "Miradero" is the name Mrs. Webb gave to a winter home that she designed and built near Palm Beach, FL, in the early 1930s.  My family acquired a derelict Miradero in 1969, saving it from certain demolition. We knew nothing of its provenance at the time. When I semi-retired in the early 1990's, my wife, Anneli, and I commenced a lengthy project to restore our relic home to its former elegance.  Research on the original owner led to unexpected discovery.

Lila's story is a once a tale of romance and despair, of the blessing and curse of inherited wealth, and above all, of a remarkable Victorian lady who drew strength from adversity.  Her lifelong journey from Vanderbilt Row in Manhattan, to Shelburne Farms in Vermont, and ultimately to the Palm Beaches, reflects a lifestyle that few of us can imagine today.

Miradero was published by the Historical Society of Palm Beach County.  Bookstore distribution is largely local but it is available online through conventional booksellers.


Jerome H. (Jerry) Farnum: New Book on Roman Legions (posted July 22, 2006)

I have had another book, The Positioning of the Roman Imperial Legions, published this year by Archaeopress in England.  It is available in the U.S. through The David Brown Book Company in Oakville, CT.  The book traces the locations of the legions through the provinces from AD30-AD300 with maps showing a coherent strategy on stationing the Roman army around the Empire.  This work follows earlier publications: 17 Ausfluege zu den alten Roemern in der Schweiz [17 Tours to the Ancient Romans in Switzerland] (Hallwag 1973); Guide romain de la Suisse [Roman Guide to Switzerland] (Payot 1975); and 20 Ausfluege zu romantischen Burgruinen in der Schweiz [20 Tours to Romantic Castle Ruins in Switzerland] (Hallwag 1976). I was also a co-translator for a 10 volume English version of Swiss legislation published 1982- 2006 by the Swiss-American Chamber of Commerce, Zurich.


Robert D. Bentley

See Robert D. Bentley's artwork at http://www.rdbentley.com/


Kenneth J. Gergen

Kenneth J. Gergen's site, showcasing his research and books, can be found here: http://www.swarthmore.edu/SocSci/kgergen1/web/page.phtml?st=home&id=home.


Walter J. Loesche

VIsit Walter J. Loesche's laboratory, based at the University of Michigan, at this address: http://www.dent.umich.edu/research/loeschelabs/


J. Edward Meyer III

J. Edward Meyer III is a state senator in Connecticut, and his site can be found at http://www.senatedems.ct.gov/Meyer.html.


Malcolm Mitchell

Malcolm Mitchell is editor of Investment Policy Magazine, located at http://www.investmentpolicy.com/.


Vic Norton

See Vic Norton's personal website at http://vic.norton.name.


Zachary H. Sacks

See the site for Zachary H. Sacks's law firm at http://www.srzcomplaw.com.


J. Morgan Thomas

J. Morgan Thomas's photos can be viewed at http://tsingle.info/. His Global Crisis Solution Center is available at http://globalcrisis.info.


Robert Weinmann

Robert Weinmann is president of the Union of American Physicians and Dentists (UAPD)'s Independent Physicians Association. Visit their site here: http://www.uapd.com/


Pat Wilde

This site is the research depository for the Marine Science Group, hosted by Pat Wilde. See it at http://www.marscigrp.org.


Robert M. Young

Robert M. Young's site, archiving his work related to Psychoanalysis and Psychotherapy, is found here: http://www.psychoanalysis-and-therapy.com/rmyoung/index.html.



John C. Fistere, Jr.

John C. Fistere, Jr.'s blog "Ramblings - Life, Politics, the Very Large and the Very Small," is located at http://jfistere.wordpress.com.


Bart Gage

Bart Gage's sermons, observations, and commentaries on scripture are located at http://www.fathergage.com.


J. Morgan Thomas

J. Morgan Thomas's blog, "Impatient Cooking: Eating Alone In Half The Time" is located at http://tsingle.info/blog.


Brian R. Walsh

Read Brian R. Walsh's blog, "A Headmaster’s Reflections" at http://brianwalshweblog.wordpress.com/.



Eli's Chosen Six, June 2012

Eli's Chosen Six, Dick Voigt at the piano, 55th reunion


Hawaii "reunion", November 2011

Psi Simons and John Westcott, Honolulu, 2011


Washington, DC classmates, September 2010

A selection of Washington DC classmates on the occasion of a luncheon gathering, September 2010. Left-to-right: Steve Hopkins, Art Gibb, Jim Banner, Steve Weitz, Andy Glass, Bob Armstrong, and Phil Pillsbury. Front and center: Don Backe.


Chris Sonne and Roly Machold

Chris Sonne and Roly Machold among Adirondack Peaks, Summer 2010.


Psi Simons: With His Sons

Psi Simons with his sons Peter ('82) and Kiff ('88) on Hokkaido, summer 2009.


Bob Bentley: His Undergraduate Roomates in 2007

Bob and Barbara Bentley, Jack and Anne Curlett, and John and Ann Shaw.


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This Page Last Updated: July 15, 2015.